Discover How to Shatter Money Taboos 

A podcast series aimed at helping all of us talk more openly about money.

Money silence has a crippling effort on our society as evidenced by:

  • 80% of spouses admitting to hiding purchases from each other
  • 70% of families failing to pass down wealth successfully due to their discomfort talking about finances
  • 50% of first marriages ending in divorce with financial conflict often cited as a leading cause
  • 70% of women failing to negotiate their salaries and in effect contributing to the wage gap
  • 69% of parents feeling more comfortable talking about sex with their teens than investing

KBK Wealth Connection is dedicated to shattering money taboos. Whether it’s engaging in a wealth conversation with your partner, your parents, your kids or your boss, this podcast series can help.

Each 20-minute audio interview, hosted by wealth psychology expert and author Kathleen Burns Kingsbury, features a special guest and a money myth that the guest wants to bust wide open. Listen on your commute to and from work, while exercising in the gym, or in the comfort of your own home. Together we can end money silence.

Recent Episodes

Myth: Parents must protect their children from college financing decisions

By | Family and Money, Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Ryan Lane, Senior Editor, American Student Assistance 

The college selection process is complex and stressful, and many parents fail to discuss the long-term financial ramifications of taking on student loan debt with their children. In today’s episode, Kathleen and Ryan discuss how many parents try to protect their children by not talking about money, but do the family a disservice by not engaging in this important and enlightening conversation. Ryan offers tips for involving your children in the college funding decision-making process and how doing so can help them avoid huge student loan debt when they graduate from school. 

Take Aways: 

  1. Start the college application process early by involving your children in the FAFSA process and talking about different ways to finance their education, such as loans, grants, scholarships, and good old hard work.
  2. Schedule a money talk with your children to discuss the FAFSA results, repayment schedule, how it may affect their college choice. Create a mock budget to demonstrate the long-term, real-life impact of each of the funding options.
  3. When discussing this topic with recent graduates, encourage them to pay down student loans faster by making an extra payment per year. Have your child calculate the amount of money saved by avoiding additional interest expenses. Then brainstorm all the other ways they could use this cash. For example, if you save $1000 in interest expense, what could you buy instead? A long weekend in Bermuda comes to mind?!

Guest Bio:

Ryan Lane is the Senior Editor, at the national nonprofit American Student Assistance. In his role, he oversees the development of articles, infographics, course materials for the organization’s free education finance support program: Salt. Working with internal and external subject matter experts, Ryan creates content that simplifies the world of college financing and helps families successfully plan for, pay for, and repay higher education expenses. Over the past three years, he has written about student loans as a co-author of the U.S. News & World Report Blog “The Student Loan Ranger.” For more information about Ryan and the ASA, visit http://www.asa.org/.

Myth: Only male entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses

By | Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Ann Bradt, Capital Ready, Co-Founder

There are many myths about entrepreneurship that can reinforce stereotypes, one of which is that only men want to grow their businesses. Kathleen and Ann bust open this myth and teach listeners the facts about female entrepreneurs and their desire to compete with the big boys. Listen in to their discussion about how women entrepreneurs can position themselves for growth, obtain venture capital, and overcome roadblocks they may face in the process.

Key Take Aways:

Women entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses but typically approach the growth process differently than their male counterparts.

Research shows that venture capitalists and bankers ask business owners different questions based on gender and these inquiries influence how funding is provided.

Both women entrepreneurs and the financial services professional who work with them need to learn how to communicate in a more gender savvy manner and how doing so is a win for both their businesses and their clients.

Guest Bio:

Ann Bradt, co-founder of Capital Ready is an accomplished expert in the financial services industry, implementing progressive people strategies for over two decades as a human resources professional at a major Canadian bank. Her extensive experience includes talent planning, leadership development, executive succession, and developing learning strategies. Ann’s passion and drive have equipped her with a broad knowledge of the industry, with her career spanning Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Capital Ready work with established businesses to help them grow and offer strategic blueprints and action plans to assess barriers and identify opportunities to optimize human and financial capital. To learn more about Capital Ready, visit www.capitalready.ca. Follow us on twitter @CapitalReadyInc

Myth: I don’t have to talk about finances before getting married.

By | Couples and Money, Podcasts | No Comments

Julie Lawrence, CFP®, Lawrence Financial Planning, LLC

Not talking about money is the number two reason couples divorce according to Marriage.com. But couples who discuss money matters regularly act as a team and report greater levels of satisfaction with their partners. In today’s episode, Kathleen and Julie Lawrence, CFP®, examine the myth that couples don’t need to talk about finances before getting married. Listen in and learn some tips for talking about money with your honey!

Key Take Aways:

  • Julie shares how she facilitates the telling of each partner’s money biography (consisting of a list of open-ended questions) and how this strategy helps the couple she works with discover their respective money mindsets.
  • Communicating honestly about your saving and spending behaviors can be challenging. But doing so can really help partners understand each other. You may not change your money behaviors, but together you can commit and work toward shared couple goals.
  • Different strategies work for different money personalities. For example, if you are a spender, setting up an automatic savings withdrawal each month makes sense. If you don’t see the money, you won’t spend it!

Julie Lawrence, CFP® opened Lawrence Financial Planning in 2009. She has more than 28 years of experience in finance and management and holds a B.A. in Management from National Louis University.

Julie has been quoted in Financial Planning magazine, Investment News, NAPFA Advisor magazine, the Saint Petersburg Times, MSNMoney.com, the Chicago Tribune and FinancialPlanning.com. She serves as a mentor for new ACP financial planners and is an active member of NAPFA.

Julie has lived in Florida since 1977. She has three children. In her spare time, she practices yoga, walks, and goes kayaking.

Myth: Keeping business costs as low as possible maximizes profits.

By | Financial Psychology, Podcasts | No Comments

Ken Lizotte, Author and Chief Imaginative Officer, emerson consulting, inc.

Many business owners believe they should maximize their profits by keeping their expenses as low as possible. In this episode, Ken Lizotte and Kathleen explore when, how, and why to invest in yourself and in your business and how that leads to sustainable profitability. As you find out, spending money to develop skills or expand your business can actually set you apart from the competition. It is what both these successful thought leaders have done, so listen in and find out how to bust this myth wide open.

Key Take Aways:

  1. Anticipate expenses. As Ken says, when you do your annual budget, set aside some resources for marketing and personal growth courses or coaching.
  2. Trust your gut. Not all investments, coaches or training programs are for all people. Do your research, and then trust your instincts.
  3. Learn from your mistakes. Part of being a business owner is taking risks and sometimes failing. When you realize that you have made a poor investment of your time or money, change course. It can be difficult to realize you have made a mistake, but the sooner you do and the quicker you change course, the better off you and your business will be.

Guest Bio:

Ken Lizotte is the author of seven books including his most recent The Speaker’s Edge: the Ultimate Go-To Guide for Locating and Landing Lots of Speaking Gigs and The Expert’s Edge: Become the Go-To Authority that People Turn to Every Time.  He is the Chief Imaginative Officer of emerson consulting group inc., a Concord, Massachusetts consulting firm that transforms speakers and consultants into “thought leaders” by helping them write and publish their ideas as articles and books. Kathleen has worked with Ken since 2010.

Ken lives in Concord, Massachusetts with his wife Barbara, daughter Chloe and Golden Retriever puppy Beckett.

Special Announcement: Check out Ken’s latest collaboration, What Would Henry Do? Essays for the 21st Century” with Introduction by Ken and featured essays by 40 scholars, activists, authors, celebrities including President Jimmy Carter. Published by Thoreau Farm, the birthplace of Henry David Thoreau as a fundraiser.

Myth: I don’t need to worry about money, some day my prince will come.

By | Podcasts, Women and Wealth, Women's Empowerment | No Comments

Barbara Stanny, Author Prince Charming Isn’t Coming

Women can have a love/hate relationship with money. Even in today’s society, some women feel they are not going to be attractive to a mate if they are financially put together. Barbara Stanny and Kathleen delve into the notion that women are still waiting for Prince Charming to rescue them financially instead of empowering themselves to learn about investments and money management. Listen in as they discuss the importance of busting this myth wide open so that women of all ages can be more financially intelligent and set a good example for the next generation.

Take Aways:

Barbara explains that getting smart about money involves a three-pronged process – the outer work (education), the inner work (money mindsets), and the higher work (your life purpose).

You need to take small steps consistently and you will see remarkable results.

Money doesn’t come from what you earn, it comes from what you do with what you earn. (Click to Tweet)]

 Barbara Stanny is the best-selling author of Prince Charming Isn’t Coming, Secrets of Six-Figure Women, and Overcoming Underearning®.  She has been teaching women how to take charge of their money and take charge of their lives for 20 plus years. An experienced mentor, wealth coach, and sought-after speaker, Barbara can help you create the wealth you desire and the life you deserve. 

Special Offer:

Free e-book “So You’ve Made Good Money…Now What?

Breaking Money Silence

Signup and Receive Podcast Updates

Receive a special thank you gift – 5 Tips for Breaking Money Silence in Your Life.

Breaking Money Silence™ Keynote Speech

Invite KBK Wealth Connection to speak at your next event and discover how to help clients identify their money mindsets, engage in wealth conversations, and raise financially savvy children.

Learn More