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Podcasts

Myth: Your business will get you to retirement by itself

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Josh Patrick, Stage 2 Planning Partners

Owning and running your own business has many aspects to it including if you want to sell your business in the future. Many business owners don’t realistically plan their exit strategy and believe that working hard in the business will reap financial rewards sufficient to fund their retirement. In this episode, Kathleen interviews Josh about the steps business owners need to take now to build a sustainable business that is saleable tomorrow.

Take aways:

  1. Be honest about your business. Is your business a lifestyle business (one that supports you financially now but is not saleable in the future) or a sustainable business that can be sold and run smoothly with you.
  2. Determine your short and long-term business goals. If you want to build a business that is saleable, you need to delegate, set up good operating systems, and have a strategic plan for your exit.
  3. Working with a consultant can help. Entrepreneurs are emotionally involved in their creation and often suffer from “shiny little light” syndrome (going from one idea to the next too quickly). Working with a consultant is a great way to learn the behaviors you need to succeed in business and set yourself up for a lucrative liquidity event.

Bio:

Josh Patrick is the owner of Stage 2 Planning Partners and is a serial entrepreneur who is obsessed with what makes a private business economically and personally sustainable. He has been a blogger for the NY Times, Inc.com, Forbes.com, The Huffington Post and Open at American Express. He hosts the podcast, The Sustainable Business and is a regular blogger and Facebook Live presenter. For more information about his work visit www.sustainablethebook.com or www.stage2planning.com.

Look for Josh’s Upcoming Book:

Check out SustainableBook.com for the latest on Josh’s new book, Sustainable: A Fable About Creating a Personally and Economically Sustainable Business, which was published in January 2018. Join his Facebook group and receive tips, tools as well as access to special promotional book offers.

Myth: For the average American, mutual funds are the only place to invest your savings.

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Janice Shade, Invest in Vermont, Milk Money https://www.milkmoneyvt.com/

Janice Shade firmly believes that you have more investment options than many people are aware of and that crowdfunding is the wave of the future. Listen to this episode, as Kathleen interviews Janice about how you can invest in small, local businesses and see a return on investment right in your backyard. (Note: The contents of this episode should not be considered investment advice.)

Take Aways:

    1. Investing in a local venture still has risk. Look at your risk comfort level and carve out 5-10% of your funds to invest in local companies. Don’t put all of your eggs in a local basket until you are savvier about investing in local companies or ventures. Diversification is always a good investment strategy.
    2. Just because you love a product or company doesn’t mean it is a good investment choice for you. It’s a great first indicator that you and others love the products or a company. But be sure to do your due diligence and look at the company’s business plan and history before investing. Find out more about the company’s leadership, mission statement, and short and long-term business plan before making a decision.
    3. The rubber hits the road when you look at the numbers of the company. Review the company’s profit and loss statement and consult with your financial advisor to help you assess the financial health of each enterprise. Here are some questions to consider asking the owner:
      • How does your company make money?
      • How much of your products or services do you think you are going to sell each year?
      • What are the costs associated with making your product or providing your service?
      • What are the other costs of running your business?

Numbers don’t lie and owners should be able to answer these basic financial inquires if they want you to invest in their business.

Bio:

Janice Shade is the co-founder of Milk Money, a pioneering “invest local” crowdfunding platform that supports Vermont’s entrepreneurial ecosystem. She is also a founding board member of the National Coalition for Community Capital and is seen as a national thought leader in this burgeoning movement. Her entrepreneurial experiences are the basis of an upcoming book that explores the impact of traditional capital markets on social entrepreneurism and provides a vision for how “Main St. investors” can be a positive force for change in their communities.

Janice received a B.S. in Finance from Boston University and an MBA in Corporate Strategy from Yale School of Management. She is an avid skier and hiker, and enthusiastic soccer/ballet Sherpa. She lives in Jericho, VT, with her husband, two daughters, and dog.

Myth: I’ll know when I’ll need help managing my finances when I’m old.

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Dr. Carolyn McClanahan, M.D. CFP®, Director of Financial Planning, Life Planning Partners
www.whealthcareplan.com

People tend to be in denial about needing help managing their finances and everyday life routines as they get older. The consequences of not talking about and planning for the aging process with your family can be emotionally and financially devastating. The good news is financial planners like Carolyn McClanahan know the risks are high and work with their clients and other advisors to make sure these conversations are occurring. In this episode, Kathleen interviews Carolyn about this myth and how you and your family members can bust through it before it’s too late.

Take Aways:

  1. Consider creating a Financial Care Taking Plan. This plan answers the question, “Who will take care of your finances if you become unable to do so?” Take time to consider how financial decisions will be made if you get into an accident, have a medical crisis, or experience some cognitive decline that prevents you paying bills, managing your investments, and making sure your assets are protected. Let family members know where accounts are and consider adding them to these accounts in case of emergency.
  2. Decide on the best living situation as you age. Talk with your family and your healthcare professional about your options. If you want to continue to live in your home as you age, find out what type of home healthcare is available, the cost of the care, and what home improvements (ex. adding hand railing in the bathrooms or making the home wheelchair accessible) Also explore assisted-living housing options in your area in case staying in your house no longer becomes feasible.
  3. Determine when you will stop driving. Driving is one of the hotter topics family members have to deal with as their parents or spouse age. Be proactive and design a transportation plan for getting around if you no longer can drive. Many families use car services, taxis, and Ubers in addition to enlisting relatives to help out. It helps to designate a family member now, when you are capable of driving, to let you know when it is time to get off the road.
  4. Communicate your healthcare wishes. Make sure you craft an estate plan with an estate attorney’s help that includes a healthcare proxy. This is a fancy word for designating a person to make healthcare decisions if you are not medically or emotionally capable of doing so. Ask yourself, “Who will help you make or to make the healthcare decisions if you cannot speak for yourself?” Once you have decided on a health care proxy, communicate your preferences for your end-of-life care. While this is a topic that may be hard to focus on now when you are healthy, letting your family know your wishes is a gift that will reduce stress and be comforting as they prepare to say goodbye.

In addition to Breaking Money Silence: How to Shatter Money Taboos, Talk More Openly about Finances, and Live a Richer Life, check out this book, Fierce Conversations by Susan Scott as it is one of Carolyn’s favorites.

Bio:

Dr. McClanahan is a physician turned financial planner who speaks regularly on the interplay between health and financial issues, particularly regarding aging, chronic illness, end-of-life, long-term care, healthcare reform, and healthcare costs. She is also co-founder of Whealthcare Planning, the gold standard in aging planning software, and writes for Forbes and Financial Planning Magazine.  Dr. McClanahan is quoted regularly in the Washington Post, New York Times, and CNBC. She has also been featured on NPR.

 

Myth: Women are not interested in finances.

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Kathleen Peace, Partner and Financial Consultant, Woodgate Financial

Join Kathleen and her guest Kathleen Peace as they bust this myth wide open and show you how women are just as savvy and interested in finances as men. Find out how even women who are labeled as “gold diggers” are demonstrating their interest in money and wealth, and discover tips for challenging your thinking when it comes to this fallacy.

Key Take Aways

  • Women investors and traders actually perform better than their male counterparts due to their calm, and more methodical approach to managing and investing money.
  • Listeners should ask the women in their lives (wives, mothers, sisters or daughters) if they are interested in finance. If these women say no, then find out why not. For those who truly are disinterested, use this underlying cause as a pathway into making financial conversations more relevant to their lives and give them a positive experience of talking about money.
  • To find out more about where your money is going, track the inflows and outflows of cash in your life. Seeing where the money flows is a great place to start examining if you are using your resources in a way that is congruent with your values and goals.

Bio:

Kathleen Peace, Partner and Financial Consultant, Woodgate Financial, has more than two decades of experience in the financial industry and has dedicated her career to being an ally and resource for female entrepreneurs.

After spending the first half of her working life on Bay and Wall Streets, she returned to Toronto to start a family and spend more of her professional life directly helping people. Now she combines her financial prowess and love for building community by acting as a personal CFO and champion to a group of driven, successful women.

Her specialties include corporate reorganization, planning for and effectively managing liquidity events, socially responsible investing, financial issues of divorce and estate planning.

Myth: Parents must protect their children from college financing decisions

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Ryan Lane, Senior Editor, American Student Assistance 

The college selection process is complex and stressful, and many parents fail to discuss the long-term financial ramifications of taking on student loan debt with their children. In today’s episode, Kathleen and Ryan discuss how many parents try to protect their children by not talking about money, but do the family a disservice by not engaging in this important and enlightening conversation. Ryan offers tips for involving your children in the college funding decision-making process and how doing so can help them avoid huge student loan debt when they graduate from school. 

Take Aways: 

  1. Start the college application process early by involving your children in the FAFSA process and talking about different ways to finance their education, such as loans, grants, scholarships, and good old hard work.
  2. Schedule a money talk with your children to discuss the FAFSA results, repayment schedule, how it may affect their college choice. Create a mock budget to demonstrate the long-term, real-life impact of each of the funding options.
  3. When discussing this topic with recent graduates, encourage them to pay down student loans faster by making an extra payment per year. Have your child calculate the amount of money saved by avoiding additional interest expenses. Then brainstorm all the other ways they could use this cash. For example, if you save $1000 in interest expense, what could you buy instead? A long weekend in Bermuda comes to mind?!

Guest Bio:

Ryan Lane is the Senior Editor, at the national nonprofit American Student Assistance. In his role, he oversees the development of articles, infographics, course materials for the organization’s free education finance support program: Salt. Working with internal and external subject matter experts, Ryan creates content that simplifies the world of college financing and helps families successfully plan for, pay for, and repay higher education expenses. Over the past three years, he has written about student loans as a co-author of the U.S. News & World Report Blog “The Student Loan Ranger.” For more information about Ryan and the ASA, visit http://www.asa.org/.

Myth: Only male entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses

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Ann Bradt, Capital Ready, Co-Founder

There are many myths about entrepreneurship that can reinforce stereotypes, one of which is that only men want to grow their businesses. Kathleen and Ann bust open this myth and teach listeners the facts about female entrepreneurs and their desire to compete with the big boys. Listen in to their discussion about how women entrepreneurs can position themselves for growth, obtain venture capital, and overcome roadblocks they may face in the process.

Key Take Aways:

Women entrepreneurs are interested in growing their businesses but typically approach the growth process differently than their male counterparts.

Research shows that venture capitalists and bankers ask business owners different questions based on gender and these inquiries influence how funding is provided.

Both women entrepreneurs and the financial services professional who work with them need to learn how to communicate in a more gender savvy manner and how doing so is a win for both their businesses and their clients.

Guest Bio:

Ann Bradt, co-founder of Capital Ready is an accomplished expert in the financial services industry, implementing progressive people strategies for over two decades as a human resources professional at a major Canadian bank. Her extensive experience includes talent planning, leadership development, executive succession, and developing learning strategies. Ann’s passion and drive have equipped her with a broad knowledge of the industry, with her career spanning Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Capital Ready work with established businesses to help them grow and offer strategic blueprints and action plans to assess barriers and identify opportunities to optimize human and financial capital. To learn more about Capital Ready, visit www.capitalready.ca. Follow us on twitter @CapitalReadyInc

Myth: I don’t have to talk about finances before getting married.

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Julie Lawrence, CFP®, Lawrence Financial Planning, LLC

Not talking about money is the number two reason couples divorce according to Marriage.com. But couples who discuss money matters regularly act as a team and report greater levels of satisfaction with their partners. In today’s episode, Kathleen and Julie Lawrence, CFP®, examine the myth that couples don’t need to talk about finances before getting married. Listen in and learn some tips for talking about money with your honey!

Key Take Aways:

  • Julie shares how she facilitates the telling of each partner’s money biography (consisting of a list of open-ended questions) and how this strategy helps the couple she works with discover their respective money mindsets.
  • Communicating honestly about your saving and spending behaviors can be challenging. But doing so can really help partners understand each other. You may not change your money behaviors, but together you can commit and work toward shared couple goals.
  • Different strategies work for different money personalities. For example, if you are a spender, setting up an automatic savings withdrawal each month makes sense. If you don’t see the money, you won’t spend it!

Julie Lawrence, CFP® opened Lawrence Financial Planning in 2009. She has more than 28 years of experience in finance and management and holds a B.A. in Management from National Louis University.

Julie has been quoted in Financial Planning magazine, Investment News, NAPFA Advisor magazine, the Saint Petersburg Times, MSNMoney.com, the Chicago Tribune and FinancialPlanning.com. She serves as a mentor for new ACP financial planners and is an active member of NAPFA.

Julie has lived in Florida since 1977. She has three children. In her spare time, she practices yoga, walks, and goes kayaking.

Myth: Keeping business costs as low as possible maximizes profits.

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Ken Lizotte, Author and Chief Imaginative Officer, emerson consulting, inc.

Many business owners believe they should maximize their profits by keeping their expenses as low as possible. In this episode, Ken Lizotte and Kathleen explore when, how, and why to invest in yourself and in your business and how that leads to sustainable profitability. As you find out, spending money to develop skills or expand your business can actually set you apart from the competition. It is what both these successful thought leaders have done, so listen in and find out how to bust this myth wide open.

Key Take Aways:

  1. Anticipate expenses. As Ken says, when you do your annual budget, set aside some resources for marketing and personal growth courses or coaching.
  2. Trust your gut. Not all investments, coaches or training programs are for all people. Do your research, and then trust your instincts.
  3. Learn from your mistakes. Part of being a business owner is taking risks and sometimes failing. When you realize that you have made a poor investment of your time or money, change course. It can be difficult to realize you have made a mistake, but the sooner you do and the quicker you change course, the better off you and your business will be.

Guest Bio:

Ken Lizotte is the author of seven books including his most recent The Speaker’s Edge: the Ultimate Go-To Guide for Locating and Landing Lots of Speaking Gigs and The Expert’s Edge: Become the Go-To Authority that People Turn to Every Time.  He is the Chief Imaginative Officer of emerson consulting group inc., a Concord, Massachusetts consulting firm that transforms speakers and consultants into “thought leaders” by helping them write and publish their ideas as articles and books. Kathleen has worked with Ken since 2010.

Ken lives in Concord, Massachusetts with his wife Barbara, daughter Chloe and Golden Retriever puppy Beckett.

Special Announcement: Check out Ken’s latest collaboration, What Would Henry Do? Essays for the 21st Century” with Introduction by Ken and featured essays by 40 scholars, activists, authors, celebrities including President Jimmy Carter. Published by Thoreau Farm, the birthplace of Henry David Thoreau as a fundraiser.

Myth: I don’t need to worry about money, some day my prince will come.

By | Podcasts, Women and Wealth, Women's Empowerment | No Comments

Barbara Stanny, Author Prince Charming Isn’t Coming

Women can have a love/hate relationship with money. Even in today’s society, some women feel they are not going to be attractive to a mate if they are financially put together. Barbara Stanny and Kathleen delve into the notion that women are still waiting for Prince Charming to rescue them financially instead of empowering themselves to learn about investments and money management. Listen in as they discuss the importance of busting this myth wide open so that women of all ages can be more financially intelligent and set a good example for the next generation.

Take Aways:

Barbara explains that getting smart about money involves a three-pronged process – the outer work (education), the inner work (money mindsets), and the higher work (your life purpose).

You need to take small steps consistently and you will see remarkable results.

Money doesn’t come from what you earn, it comes from what you do with what you earn. (Click to Tweet)]

 Barbara Stanny is the best-selling author of Prince Charming Isn’t Coming, Secrets of Six-Figure Women, and Overcoming Underearning®.  She has been teaching women how to take charge of their money and take charge of their lives for 20 plus years. An experienced mentor, wealth coach, and sought-after speaker, Barbara can help you create the wealth you desire and the life you deserve. 

Special Offer:

Free e-book “So You’ve Made Good Money…Now What?

Myth: Couples don’t need to talk about money

By | Couples and Money, Podcasts | No Comments

Dr. Dorian Mintzer, Revolution Retirement

As a child, Dori grew up recognizing different money mindsets by watching her parents’ financial habits. Couples may have a division of labor when it comes to finances; but, it is important they talk about them so they know what questions should be asked in times of crisis. Dori and Kathleen explore this myth and why it is important that couples need to talk about money and that is actually an act of love.

Take Aways:

  • Use “I” statements when talking about money
  • Ask a third person (financial advisor, banker, estate attorney, relationship or money coach) to help facilitate these conversations
  • Appreciate your partner in a money conversation (share what it was like growing up, was money talked about, what does money mean to you, etc.)

How do you honestly and openly talk about money as a couple? (Click to Tweet)

Dr. Dori Mintzer – With over 40 years of experience as a psychologist, Dr. Dorian Mintzer (Dori) is an experienced therapist, executive coach, consultant, speaker, and writer. She is the co-author of The Couples Retirement Puzzle: The 10 Must-Have Conversations for Creating an Amazing New Life Together, and co-producer of “The Career Playbook: Second Half Plays. Dori has been featured in a variety of media such as the NY Times, Wall Street Journal, NPR, ABC Evening News, and the Today Show. For more information visit www.revolutionizeretirement.com.

Special Offer:

Virtual: The 4th Tuesday Revolutionize your Retirement Interview with Expert’s Series is at 12:00 noon eastern time and open to professionals and the public. Sign-up begins the week before each call at www.revolutionizeretirement.com.

To sign up for the Breaking Money Silence Podcast, click here.